Bare-root is shipped March 1 - May 15 Dwarf dogwood, also known as red-tipped dogwood, is a small compact, mounded shrub reaching 2 to 3 feet high and 3 to 4 feet wide. Should be useful as a bank cover or ground cover. Tolerant of a wide range of soils, including swampy or boggy conditions. They aren’t bothered by air pollution. 'Mahzam' (Mahoning™) - A large stoloniferous shrubby form, growing 10' tall with good gray winter stem color. 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The shrubs thrive in full sun or partial shade and almost any soil. Powdery mildew and leaf spots. The mature black fruit are a favorite of birds. The gray dogwood (Cornus racemosa) is native to Iowa. tall. Dwarf cornel dogwoods, often called bunchberry but a different species than the bunchberry flowering vine, are a decorative addition to your garden or backyard. The margins of the grey-green leaf are white and the leaf is flushed with pink. Browse pictures and read growth / cultivation information about Gray Dogwood, Grey Dogwood (Cornus racemosa) 'Muskingum' supplied by member gardeners in the PlantFiles database at Dave's Garden. Any plant growing in its native range has natural controls to keep it in check, so native plants aren’t invasive. Each bloom is different and truly stands out. Redosier Dogwood Cornus sericea Description & Overview Redosier Dogwood is a uniquely beautiful Wisconsin native shrub that provides food and shelter to nearly 100 species of birds. These shrubs tolerate dry soil, so they seldom need watering, and never need fertilizer. Summer color is a shiny dark green. Deciduous. Opposite, 3 inch long ovate leaves with pointed tips that emerge red. Our trees. Your Gray Dogwood would clearly be an exceptional addition to your yard under almost any conditions. Plants prefer full sun to part shade in well-drained soil. Abundant clusters of creamy-white flowers at tips of branches in late May and June. Cornus Wolf Eyes - This stunning dogwood produces gray-green leaves that are accented with ivory along wavy margins. Relatively disease tolerant. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants with less refined foliage. Growth Rate and Mature Height Depending on the species of Dogwood you plant, you may have a short stout bush or a 25 foot tall tree. Pull them up whenever possible. Gray dogwood care is a snap too. Our future. How to Transplant Dogwoods. It is an adaptable shrub which tolerates wet or dry soils, shade or sun. Very low maintenance, prune out older stems to promote new growth. The berries appear before most other dogwoods, making it popular with the squirrels and over 100 bird species that eat the fruit. New leaves emerge purplish-red leaf and leaf tips remain red as the rest of leaf matures to green. A seriously small cultivar, the dwarf dogwood (Cornus canadensis) has many of the traits of a traditional dogwood although it's not not actually a tree, but a ground cover. This petite tree has such showy blooms in the early spring. Dwarf dogwood Dwarf dogwood, also known as red-tipped dogwood, is a small compact, mounded shrub reaching 2 to 3 feet high and 3 to 4 feet wide. use escape to move to top level menu parent. Flowers are white but more cream than pure white; and some years flowers have a green cast. Up to 20 ft. tall and wide. includes about 45 species of small trees and shrubs, as well as a few woody perennials. Over time, the shrub forms a thicket unless it’s thinned from time to time. L ate spring interest appears as clusters of white blossoms that later transition to fruit. Growing gray dogwood shrubs in a row provides a screen against unsightly views, strong winds, and harsh sunlight. As wildlife plants, gray dogwood thickets provide shelter, hiding places, and nesting sites for birds and small mammals. Although you may not want to plant it in a formal garden, it is right at home in a wildlife area or a location with poor, wet soil. Find more gardening information on Gardening Know How: Keep up to date with all that's happening in and around the garden. All the fabulousness of a typical C. kousa (flowers! Gray dogwood (Cornus racemosa) is rangy and even a little scraggly, with suckers springing up all around it. Natural Areas Conservation Training Program, Black walnut toxicity (plants tolerant of), Preventing construction damage to trees and shrubs, Trees and shrubs for the four seasons landscape, Sudden Oak Death, Ramorum Blight and Phytophthora ramorum, Eastern United States Wetlands Collection. See more ideas about dwarf trees, dwarf trees for landscaping, front yard landscaping. Wolf Eyes Japanese Dogwood Zone: 5 – 8. It produces multiple suckers that become new stems. Gray dogwood reaches a height of 8 to 10 feet. Although you can grow it as a tree, a gray dogwood tree soon becomes a multi-stemmed shrub without constant attention in removing the suckers. You can search, browse, and learn more about the plants in our living collections by visiting our BRAHMS website. The fruit are produced on reddish pink stalks. Use up and down arrow keys to explore within a submenu. This is undoubtedly a specimen quality tree for adding interest to any landscape. Autumn Rose - Upright, vase-shaped. Gray dogwood can, however, become aggressive in the landscape. Huron Gray Dogwood is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with a more or less rounded form. Partial sun. Aptly named, this shrub's twigs are grey, rather than brown, which offer a cool contrast to its growth. The Grey Twig Dogwood's lance-shaped foliage emerges in an elegant grey-green that transitions to a rich purple-red for the autumn months. Dwarf dogwood, dwarf red-tipped dogwood, dwarf redtwig dogwood. Stop by, email, or call. The white winter berries only last a short time and don’t add much to the appearance of the shrub. As an urban ornamental, it can be highly pruned and maintained, meaning that it does not have a defined life expectancy (1). Partially removed suckers soon return. Full to partial sun. This is undoubtedly a specimen quality tree for adding interest to any landscape. It grows 10-15' tall and features white flowers borne in terminal racemes (hence the species name of racemosa) in late spring and grayish-green, elliptic to lance-shaped leaves (2-4\" long). It can be used as a stunning hedge or border plant in just about any soil conditions. In late spring, abundant clusters of slightly fragrant flowers attract butterflies. Terminal stems hol… Cutting grown. The biggest task in caring for gray dogwood is keeping the suckers at bay. Gray dogwood is a native plant that is not considered invasive in any part of the U.S. A suitable plant for stabilizing soil. You'll never tire of the color play between clear red, pink-red and rose-pink. Excellent for moist situations. This adorable dogwood makes the perfect addition to pathways, outdoor seating areas and smaller landscapes. Trim roots with a spade and promptly remove root suckers if colonial spread is undesired. Blue Shadow - This dogwood tree is broad and full. … Use in a group or as a low hedge. Gray Dogwood: Ohio Buckeye or Horse Chestnut: Serviceberry: Deciduous Shrubs - Common Name (Botanical Name) Alpine Currant (Ribes alpunum) Gray Dogwood (Cornus racemosa) Barberry (Berberis; red, green, yellow) Honeysuckle ('Arnolds Red') Beautybush (Kokwitzia) Honeysuckle (Lonicera 'Honeyrose') Bluebeard (perennial) (Caryopteris x clandonesis) Leaves simple, opposite, 5-10 cm long, half as wide, narrow-elliptic, margin entire, green in summer and may become deep red in fall. The fall leaves are dark reddish purple, and while the color is interesting, you wouldn’t call it attractive. Shrubs That Deer Usually Ignore Many smaller, shrubby plants are also resistant to deer, including Boxwood for hedges and edging, adding another big plus mark to that valuable plant. The genus of dogwoods (Cornus spp.) Gray Dogwood will grow 10-15 feet tall with an equal spread, but can be pruned to almost any size. Multi-stemmed in form, it will generally reach a height and spread of 10-15 feet. Have tree and plant questions? Foliage turns an interesting (but not always showy) dusky purplish red in fall. The following menu has 3 levels. This plant then transform come fall showcasing purple foliage in fall. This is a high maintenance shrub that will require regular care and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter once the threat of extreme cold has passed. Use up and down arrow keys to explore within a submenu. Get expert help from The Morton Arboretum Plant Clinic. Grey dogwood is a commonly planted ornamental shrub. The gray dogwood isn’t a tidy or attractive plant that you would want to plant in a well-groomed garden, but if you are planting a wildlife area or want a shrub for difficult conditions, it may be just what you need. Within a submenu, use escape to move to top level menu parent. berries!) Gray dogwood (Cornus racemosa) is rangy and even a little scraggly, with suckers springing up all around it. https://www.mortonarb.org/trees-plants/tree-plant-descriptions/gray-dogwood Read on for information about this humble shrub. Thriving in wet areas, with suckering […] It forms a dense thicket, providing cover and nesting sites for wildlife. It has a round headed with a profusion of creamy white flowers followed by white fruits borne on bright red bracts. The gray dogwood is a forage plant for white-tailed deer. Use left and right arrow keys to navigate between menus and submenus. The shrubs grow into a thick groundcover 4 to 10 inches (10-25 cm.) It produces whitish flowers in late spring which are followed by small white berries. Best stem color occurs on young stems. Flowering Dogwood (Cornus) – Smothered in white or pink blooms, all the many kinds of these beautiful trees will generally be left alone, as also will the fruits. In the fall, the pink areas are more intense. Rough Leaf Dogwood (Cornus drummondii) Feel the coarse hairs found on the leaves in this species … The berries appear before most other dogwoods, making it popular with the squirrels and over 100 bird species that eat the fruit. Don't let the miniature size fool you. This shrub adapts to dry and sandy soils. The Dwarf Dogwood "Poncho" is a Japanese Dogwood that only grows to 8-10 ft., unlike an American Dogwood, which can reach heights of 25 ft. Pacific Dogwood (Cornus Nuttallii) Pacific dogwoods are native to the west coast of North America. May 2, 2020 - Explore Lynda Morgan's board "Dwarf trees for landscaping" on Pinterest. From top level menus, use escape to exit the menu. Browse the curated collection and add your voice! Sign up for our newsletter. Our communities. but with gray-green variegated leaves that fade to pink in fall. Bright yellow stems on the younger growth of this many-stemmed bushy shrub are striking during winter. The Poncho Dogwood may be small, but it is mighty. The Morton Arboretum is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit that relies on the generosity of members and donors. It is adaptable to poor soils, heat and drought, but is often seen in moist or rocky locations. The gray dogwood is a forage plant for white-tailed deer. These short shrubs spread quickly via runners that grow from the horizontal rootstock. In fact, it is recommended as an alternative to invasive shrubs such as non-native honeysuckle. Explore this online platform for Chicago-area residents to share their favorite stories about trees. Very slow growing. Cornus racemosa, commonly called gray dogwood, is a deciduous shrub which is native to Missouri and typically occurs in moist or rocky ground along streams, ponds, wet meadows, glade and prairie margins, thickets and rocky bluffs. If you have to cut them, cut them at the source below the surface of the soil. Deciduous shrub, 10-15 ft (3-4.5 m), mulitstemmed, erect, suckering. 'Muszam' (Muckingum™ )- A dwarf form that grows 2' tall, with a 4' spread. The fall leaves are dark reddish purple, and while the color is interesting, you wouldn’t call it attractive. White, star-shaped flowers are followed by white fruit. Sweetspire (Itea virginica) – Dwarf Shrub with White Flowers. Building the urban forest for 2050. The Gray Dogwood is a native, gray-stemmed, thickly branched shrub. The flowers attract butterflies, and some species use them as larval host plants. Dogwood, Gray: Dogwood, Silky: Dwarf Rose Hedge-Sandy: Forsythia, Lynwood Gold: Lilac, Old Fashioned: Potentilla, Abbottswood: Spirea, Lemon Princess: Spirea, Shirobana: All nursery stock listed is bare-root stock unless otherwise noted. It forms a dense thicket, providing cover and nesting sites for wildlife. Use left and right arrow keys to navigate between menus and submenus. The white winter berries only last a short time and don’t add much to the appearance of the shrub. Moderate-growing to 6 to 8 ft. tall, 7 to 9 ft. wide. Held on bare branches, the "flowers" are actually four flower bracts that surround a little button of true flowers. Best grown in organically rich, fertile, consistently moist soils in full sun to part shade. New leaves emerge purplish-red leaf and leaf tips remain red as the rest of leaf matures to green. Fall: rose-pink. Cornus is a genus of about 30–60 species of woody plants in the family Cornaceae, commonly known as dogwoods, which can generally be distinguished by their blossoms, berries, and distinctive bark. Sign up to get all the latest gardening tips! Several species of birds eat the berries, including Eastern bluebirds, Northern cardinals, Northern flickers, and downy woodpeckers. Tolerant of soil pH. In late spring, abundant clusters of slightly fragrant flowers attract butterflies.